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NEWS

APSIM Training, Brisbane, 11th and 12th October 2016

The APSIM training course originally planned for August in Brisbane, Australia has been rescheduled for 11th and 12th October 2016.

You can view the training program and registration form here.

Monday, 8 August 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (711)
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APSIM Training, Brisbane, August 2016 - POSTPONED, NEW DATE TO BE ADVISED

 Due to unforeseen circumstances the APSIM training course originally scheduled for the 9th & 10th August 2016 in Brisbane, Australia will be postponed. A new date will be advised as soon as possible.


Friday, 10 June 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (1378)
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APSIM 7.8 Release

Apsim version 7.8 has been released. You can download it from the registration page or view a list of the issues addressed here.

Thursday, 24 March 2016/Author: Dean Holzworth/Number of views (2045)
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APSIM Training - Toowoomba, AUSTRALIA, 4th & 5th May 2016

The next APSIM training course is scheduled to be held in Toowoomba, AUSTRALIA, on the 4th & 5th May 2016. 

You can view the training program and registration form here.

Tuesday, 8 March 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (1761)
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AgResearch Ltd. NZ joins the APSIM Initiative.

Trans-Tasman collaboration in agricultural systems research has taken a step forward with AgResearch Ltd (www.agresearch.co.nz), New Zealand’s largest Crown Research Institute, recently signed up to the APSIM Initiative (AI) unincorporated joint venture. The AI was established in 2007 to promote the development and use of the science modules and infrastructure software of APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems Simulator). The Foundation Members of the AI are CSIRO, DAF and UQ.

AgResearch brings an extensive range of expertise to the AI collaboration, including science and modelling relating to:
  • Dairy systems;
  • Stock and pasture;
  • Soil carbon and nitrogen;
  • Whole farm and multi-paddock; and
  • Pastoral agro-ecosystems.

In addition, AgResearch has been actively involved in the development of APSIM for several years, has led or contributed to the development of several modules including AgPasture, MicroMet and SoilNitrogen and has already contributed to over 40 indexed publications concerned with the development or usage of APSIM. 

Tuesday, 19 January 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (1705)
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FEATURES

International Crop Modeling Symposium Shows New Opportunities

More than 300 scientists from 47 nations met in Berlin, Germany, during March 15-17, 2016 to exchange ideas on improvement and application of crop simulation models to better predict agricultural production and food security under global climate change. The symposium was co-organized by MACSUR (Modelling European Agriculture with Climate Change for Food Security, http://macsur.eu/) and AgMIP (Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project, http://www.agmip.org/), and was locally hosted by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) in Müncheberg, Germany.

During the 3-day meeting, there were a total of 85 presentations and 130 poster presentations.  There were plenary lectures by James Jones (University of Florida, USA; The next Generation of Crop Models), Serge Savary (INRA, Toulouse, France; Models for Crop Diseases), Graeme Hammer (University of Queensland, Australia; Modelling and Genetics), Andrew J. Challinor (University of Leeds, UK; Models and Climate), Brian Keating (CSIRO, Australia; Models and Cropping Systems) and Achim Dobermann (Director of Rothamsted Research). Closing plenary lecture was given by Prof. Martin Kropff (Director General of the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, CIMMYT).

iCROPM2016 Symposium keynote presentations and abstracts are available at http://communications.ext.zalf.de/sites/crop-modelling/SitePages/Symposium%20Presentations.aspx

Tuesday, 10 May 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (1314)
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APSIM demonstrates the importance of rotations for simulating climate impact assessments.

In a recently published article Teixeira et al. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2015.05.012) used APSIM to assess the impact of different methods of representing the initial conditions of the soil.  In climate impact studies, weather data are commonly taken over a 20-30 year period to assess inter-annual variability of crop production.  Often, for simplification, individual crops (monocultures) are sown on the same date every year and soil water and nitrogen are reinitialised to default values prior to planting (re-initialised monoculture). However, in reality crops are often grown in a rotation and the soil conditions they encounter at planting are the result of the water and nitrogen balances of the preceding crops and fallow periods.  APSIM is able to construct realistic rotations and represent carryover effects of crop sequences. Teixeira et al. simulated a continuous wheat (grain) ® wheat (forage) ® kale (forage) ® maize (grain) rotation over a 30 years to compare with re-initialised mono-culture simulations.  The production, water use and soil nitrogen of simulated crops were all sensitive to the method of simulation (re-initialised mono-culture vs. continuous rotation) and the sensitivities were greatest when inputs (water and nitrogen) were lowest. This paper shows that greater emphasis should be placed on obtaining suitable initial conditions for simulating crop production, particularly for low intensity crop production systems.  It is difficult to achieve this in single crop simulations, which illustrates the benefit of representing the carryover of soil conditions across multiple crops grown in a sequence as performed with APSIM in this study.

Wednesday, 9 March 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (1918)
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Global agricultural systems modelling community convening in Berlin

In March 2016, agricultural systems modellers will meet in Berlin, Germany, for an international symposium, coordinated by scientists from Germany, Finland, Australia and the USA. The agricultural systems modelling network spans the whole globe and more than 300 participants are expected to show up for the event, organized by the Leibniz Centre of Agricultural Landscape Research in Müncheberg, Germany. Crop models have developed into indispensable tools in the ongoing discussion on global food security, but only their consistent application through global co-operation assures their usefulness and credibility at the interfaces of agronomy with economics and in informing policy-making. Additional details can be found on the symposium flyer or website www.icropm2016.org.

Tuesday, 19 January 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (2284)
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APSIM next generation

Over 24 years, the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) has grown from a farming systems framework used by a small number of people, into a large collection of models used by many thousands of modellers internationally. The software consists of many hundreds of thousands of lines of code in multiple programming languages. This infrastructure has successfully integrated a diverse range of models but isn’t capable of easily meeting new demands from modellers. For these reasons, the APSIM Initiative has begun developing a next generation of APSIM (dubbed APSIM next generation) that is a completely new application with no legacy code and designed to run across different platforms. Currently APSIM next generation has limited capability and isn't quite ready for mainstream use. However, if your modelling problems fits within the specified capability, or you simply wish to evaluate this release, then it can be downloaded from the APSIM registration page (look for 'next generation' in the version drop down box). More information can also be found here.

Monday, 14 September 2015/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (2711)
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APSIM Oil Palm Model

Palm oil is an important vegetable oil, produced from oil palm grown by many companies and more than a million smallholders worldwide. For growers to make decisions that are good for productivity and the environment, they need to know which practices are best for crop yield, soil fertility, aquatic ecosystems, and to minimise greenhouse gas emissions.   Recent collaboration between ACIAR, James Cook University, CSIRO and the PNG Oil Palm Research Association has developed an Oil Palm model for APSIM.  The model simulates palm growth and development in response to climate, soil and management.  Training workshops have been held in PNG, Indonesia and Malaysia.  A paper describing the new model is available at the following link.

Monday, 3 August 2015/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (3014)
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