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NEWS

nasapower: NASA POWER Global Meteorology, Surface Solar Energy and Climatology Data Client

International users of APSIM can now enjoy easy access to APSIM metrological files (.met files) from NASA POWER via a new R package developed by USQ’s Associate Professor of Field Crops Pathology Dr Adam Sparks called nasapower now available on CRAN.  One of the functions in this new package takes the NASA POWER agroclimatology data and reformats it into an APSIM .met file for use in APSIM simulations.  Information and documentation for the new package can be found at https://ropensci.github.io/nasapower/.

Thursday, 18 October 2018/Author: Sarah Cleary/Number of views (16)/Comments (0)/
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Updated Instructions for Submission of Improvements to APSIM for Review

As a user of APSIM, you may access and modify all source code. As per the conditions agreed to on download, all modifications to APSIM must be submitted to the AI and be subject to the Reference Panel evaluation process before inclusion into the official APSIM release. Updated instructions for submitting Improvements to APSIM for review by the APSIM Initiative Reference Panel can be found here

It can be useful to notify the APSIM Initiative that you are planning on making an improvement to APSIM. This can often lead to others suggesting ideas or collaborators to work with. To do this you need to create an issue in GitHub with a description of what you intend doing. This is for APSIM 7.x and APSIM Next Generation.  Any queries, please email apsim@csiro.au.

Tuesday, 9 October 2018/Author: Sarah Cleary/Number of views (25)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM Initiative Development Plan

The APSIM Initiative Development Plan is now available: http://www.apsim.info/AboutUs/DevelopmentPlan.aspx

The plan outlines work that is currently being undertaken by APSIM Initiative Members and partners.  It covers work that is being carried out this year as well as planned or aspirational work in the near future. 

If you’re interested in more information, co-developing or partnering in any of this work, please email apsim@csiro.au.

Monday, 24 September 2018/Author: Sarah Cleary/Number of views (49)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM Initiative Strategic Plan

The APSIM Initiative Strategic Plan is now available.  The plan summarises the Mission and Vision of the APSIM Initiative whilst clearly outlining the purpose and objectives for APSIM. 

The APSIM Initiative welcomes feedback from our stakeholders.  It can be found at http://www.apsim.info/AboutUs/StrategicPlan.aspx

Wednesday, 5 September 2018/Author: Sarah Cleary/Number of views (84)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM Downloads for 17/18

 

For the 2017/18 year there were 2103 non-commercial licenced users registered (an 11% increase on the previous year). This resulted in some 3775 downloads of APSIM (all versions as some users download older versions or use multiple versions).

APSIM is being used in 116 countries around the world, around the same number as the previous year. In Australia there are 482 users (up from 462 the previous year), with 157 in Queensland, an increase of 51 users. In New Zealand there were 46 users.

Monday, 30 July 2018/Author: Sarah Cleary/Number of views (332)/Comments (0)/
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FEATURES

Modelling forage yield and water productivity of continuous crop sequences in the Argentinian Pampas

The global area and farming systems to which APSIM can be applied with confidence to have recently expanded with a research article recently published in the European Journal of Agronomy. A validation analysis showed that APSIM was able to accurately simulate the forage yield and water productivity of a range of forage crops and also continuous forage crop rotations across the Argentinian Pampas. Forage crops that the model was tested for includes maize, soybean, wheat, oats, annual ryegrass and barley. Water productivity was simulated with a greater accuracy when considering the whole crop rotation rather than individual crops. Crop forage yield simulated with greater accuracy for crops harvest without regrown compared to crops harvested frequently and allowed to regrowth.

For further details see the new paper titled ‘Modelling forage yield and water productivity of continuous crop sequences in the Argentinian Pampas’ published in European Journal of Agronomy at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eja.2017.10.004.

Monday, 5 February 2018/Author: Dean Holzworth/Number of views (1454)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM features in international intercomparison of simulation models for grassland and crop yield and N2O emissions

In a paper recently accepted for publication in Global Change Biology (published open access), APSIM has contributed to an assessment of the ability of simulation models to simultaneously predict yield and N2O emissions.  The study included five variants of APSIM (two in the crop part of the study and three in the grasslands part).  In this study the modellers started with little site information (soil properties, weather data, management information) as Stage 1 and incrementally more data was supplied until in Stage 5 modellers had all available data.  Crop model outputs improved at Stage 3 when phenology information was made available but grassland model outputs were little affected by the availability of additional information.  As with other intercomparisons, the ensemble median performed better than any one model when considering multiple sites.  It was found that a small ensemble of three models outperformed the full ensemble.  This is the first study which has examined the effect of data availability of the performance of an ensemble and also the first examining both yield and N2O emissions.

Thursday, 9 November 2017/Author: Dean Holzworth/Number of views (1958)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM used in over 110 countries

APSIM is now being used in over 110 countries around the world. For the 2016/17 reporting year there were just over 1870 R&D non-commercial licensed users, around a 10% increase on the previous year. This resulted in some 2960 downloads of all versions.
A copy of the APSIM users map is available here.
Thursday, 3 August 2017/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (1759)/Comments (0)/
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Simulating carbon dioxide fertilisation in crops

To model crop growth under the higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations that will occur in the future, there needs to be and accurate representation of the link between atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and growth.

A review of APSIM’s crop models showed that carbon dioxide fertilisation effects were well founded, tested and documented in a number of important (mainly C3 crops) crops, notably wheat. There was agreement that many of these well founded representations could be generalised to other crops with similar photosynthetic pathways (e.g. generalising the science in wheat to other C3 crops). The situation was less well substantiated in crops with the C4 photosynthetic pathway.

The overall conclusion is that for a range of important crops, the general situation of representing carbon dioxide fertilisation effects on photosynthesis and transpiration in APSIM was close to the ‘state of the art’ given current understanding of, and data on the processes involved, and the aims of the APSIM model. There is an immediate need for better documentation of the representation of carbon dioxide fertilisation in APSIM, and a strategic need for further research and model development in this area.

For further details see the new paper titled Responses to atmospheric CO2 concentrations in crop simulation models: a review of current simple and semicomplex representations and options for model development published in Global Change Biology at the following link.

The current status of the representation, parameterisation and validation of CO2 fertilisation of plants in APSIM compiled by Vanuytrecht and Thorburn is also available here.

Wednesday, 29 March 2017/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (2161)/Comments (0)/
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International Crop Modeling Symposium Shows New Opportunities

More than 300 scientists from 47 nations met in Berlin, Germany, during March 15-17, 2016 to exchange ideas on improvement and application of crop simulation models to better predict agricultural production and food security under global climate change. The symposium was co-organized by MACSUR (Modelling European Agriculture with Climate Change for Food Security, http://macsur.eu/) and AgMIP (Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project, http://www.agmip.org/), and was locally hosted by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) in Müncheberg, Germany.

During the 3-day meeting, there were a total of 85 presentations and 130 poster presentations.  There were plenary lectures by James Jones (University of Florida, USA; The next Generation of Crop Models), Serge Savary (INRA, Toulouse, France; Models for Crop Diseases), Graeme Hammer (University of Queensland, Australia; Modelling and Genetics), Andrew J. Challinor (University of Leeds, UK; Models and Climate), Brian Keating (CSIRO, Australia; Models and Cropping Systems) and Achim Dobermann (Director of Rothamsted Research). Closing plenary lecture was given by Prof. Martin Kropff (Director General of the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, CIMMYT).

iCROPM2016 Symposium keynote presentations and abstracts are available at http://communications.ext.zalf.de/sites/crop-modelling/SitePages/Symposium%20Presentations.aspx

Tuesday, 10 May 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (4966)/Comments (0)/
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