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University of Southern Queensland joins the APSIM initiative.

The APSIM initiative has been further strengthened with the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) recently joining the APSIM initiative (AI) as a member. 

USQ brings an extensive range of expertise to the AI collaboration including:

  • Cropping and grazing system
  • Climate Science
  • Bio-economics
  • Interface design
  • Data analytics
  • App and decision support tool design and development
  • Development of educational materials using APSIM

USQ has been an active user of APSIM in its research and educational activities and its membership reflects its dedication to the continued improvement of the model’s science and applications. 

For more details see https://www.usq.edu.au/news-events/news/2017/10/usq-joins-apsim
Thursday, 26 October 2017/Author: Dean Holzworth/Number of views (92)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM Training, Brisbane, 11th and 12th October 2017

The next APSIM training course is scheduled for 11th and 12th October 2017 in Brisbane, Australia.

You can view the training program and registration form here.


Thursday, 3 August 2017/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (658)/Comments (0)/
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Biochar model

Iowa State University (Archontoulis et al. 2016) have developed a biochar model for APSIM that integrates biochar knowledge and enables simulation of biochar effects within cropping systems.

This model has been released in APSIM  7.9 as an 'example'. It can be accessed by clicking 'New' from within the user interface and selecting the biochar folder. For more details see http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12314/full

Wednesday, 17 May 2017/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (777)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM 7.9 Release


APSIM version 7.9 has been released. You can download it from the registration page or view a list of the issues addressed here.
Wednesday, 3 May 2017/Author: Dean Holzworth/Number of views (921)/Comments (0)/
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APSIM Training, Brisbane, 11th and 12th October 2016

The APSIM training course originally planned for August in Brisbane, Australia has been rescheduled for 11th and 12th October 2016.

You can view the training program and registration form here.

Monday, 8 August 2016/Author: Chris Murphy/Number of views (2312)/Comments (0)/
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FEATURES

APSIM demonstrates the importance of rotations for simulating climate impact assessments.

Author: Chris Murphy/Wednesday, 9 March 2016/Categories: Features


In a recently published article Teixeira et al. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2015.05.012) used APSIM to assess the impact of different methods of representing the initial conditions of the soil.  In climate impact studies, weather data are commonly taken over a 20-30 year period to assess inter-annual variability of crop production.  Often, for simplification, individual crops (monocultures) are sown on the same date every year and soil water and nitrogen are reinitialised to default values prior to planting (re-initialised monoculture). However, in reality crops are often grown in a rotation and the soil conditions they encounter at planting are the result of the water and nitrogen balances of the preceding crops and fallow periods.  APSIM is able to construct realistic rotations and represent carryover effects of crop sequences. Teixeira et al. simulated a continuous wheat (grain) ® wheat (forage) ® kale (forage) ® maize (grain) rotation over a 30 years to compare with re-initialised mono-culture simulations.  The production, water use and soil nitrogen of simulated crops were all sensitive to the method of simulation (re-initialised mono-culture vs. continuous rotation) and the sensitivities were greatest when inputs (water and nitrogen) were lowest. This paper shows that greater emphasis should be placed on obtaining suitable initial conditions for simulating crop production, particularly for low intensity crop production systems.  It is difficult to achieve this in single crop simulations, which illustrates the benefit of representing the carryover of soil conditions across multiple crops grown in a sequence as performed with APSIM in this study.



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